Easter 2018

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A Sermon for Easter Day, April 1, 2018
The Epistle, Colossians 3:1-4The Gospel, St. John 20:1-18
The Rt. Rev’d Stephen C. Scarlett


If you then were raised with Christ, seek those things which are above, where Christ is, sitting at the right hand of God. Set your mind on things above, not on things on the earth. For you died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is our life appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory

-The Easter Epistle


I. Easter and remembrance
The concept of remembrance is central in the Bible because we are forgetful people. We were created in God’s image and given dominion over the creation, but we forgot the goodness and generosity of our maker. We believed the serpent’s lie, forfeited our throne, and became servants of the creation rather than its rulers. Whenever God intervened in history to save his people and restore them to their former dignity, he commanded his people to remember. “Remember this day when God led you out of Egypt” (Ex 13:3). Remember how God led you through the wilderness to test you (Deut. 8:2). “Do this in Remembrance of me” (Luke 22:19).

To remember in the Bible is not just to think about some past thing. To remember means to experience God’s saving power again, right now. The ancient rabbis taught that when each generation of Jewish people celebrated the memorial feast of the Passover (Ex 13:3), it was as if they set their own feet on the bottom of the Red Sea. During Holy Week, we remember, and experience again, the Passover deliverance of Israel as it was fulfilled by Jesus in the new Exodus. We freed from the tyranny of Satan, sin and death through the cross and resurrection of Jesus.

On Easter, we remember our baptism. Baptism is the historical moment when each of us participated in the events of Good Friday and Easter. As St. Paul explains in Colossians (a few verses before the Easter epistle), you were “buried with [Christ]in baptism, in which you also were raised with Him through faith” (Col. 2:12). In Lent we focused on remembering one part of baptism; our death to sin through renewed repentance. Easter calls us to remember the other part of our baptism; rising again to new life through renewed faith.

II. Eastertide
As we remember that we died and rose with Christ in baptism, we remember that baptism gives us a vocation. The Easter epistle exhorts us, “If you then were raised with Christ, seek those things which are above.” “Seek” is a present tense verb that implies constant activity. Easter is not just a day. Easter is a forty-day season and a way of life.

We adopted certain practices for Lent. Easter calls for its own unique disciplines and practices. So, what will we do for Easter? How will we seek those things which are above? One answer is simple. We will do all the things we weren’t doing for Lent! However, there a danger of turning the Lent/Easter baptismal experience into a kind of purge/binge disorder. We fasted to detach ourselves from things and make more room in our lives for Christ. We feast now to embrace the life for which we made more room. What does that life look like?

The first discipline of Easter is to establish prayer as the foundation of our lives. We do not fast and pray in Lent so that we can feast and not pray in Easter. In Easter the focus of prayer shifts from the penitence and preparation of Lent to praise and thanksgiving for the life we have received. The central act of Christian prayer is called the Eucharist, which means thanksgiving. We gather around the altar to give thanks for all that Christ has done for us. Easter is a Eucharistic season, a season to leave behind the murmuring and grumbling of the wilderness and give thanks for our entry into the Promised Land of God’s New Creation.

But someone might object: “My life is difficult and painful. How can I give thanks?” Consider this. Apart from the experience of baptism into Christ, the pain and the challenges of life remain. We are just alone in them. We give thanks that Christ is present with us; that our pain is united with his pain through the cross in the hope of resurrection. We give thanks because “Our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory” (2 Cor. 4:17).
During Easter, practice giving thanks to God each day. When you are tempted to grumble and complain, give thanks instead. Give thanks for the good things he has given you. Give thanks for his presence with you in your tribulations. During Easter, cultivate a Eucharistic heart.

During the season of Easter, practice reconciliation. Our sins have been washed away in baptism. Now, let us forgive those who have sinned against us. In a world full of lust for revenge, let us be agents of grace. Reconciliation in not possible in all our relationships. However, in Easter, let that not be because we are unwilling.

During Easter, let us seek the things which are above is by cultivating the virtue of detachment from the world. The witness of the church is handicapped by the captivity of its member to temporal causes and goals that overshadow their faith. Christ becomes the means to getting something in this world. Detachment means not being enslaved to temporal goals and to the false promises and anxieties of the world—the very things we renounced in baptism.

Detachment is not a lack of concern for the world. Rather detachment remembers that this world cannot be perfected, and death cannot be conquered, apart from the Cross and Resurrection of Jesus. Our goal is not to “make this world a better place” or end hunger, poverty, or injustice, or create the perfect economic system. Our aim is to love God with all our heart, soul, and mind and to love our neighbor as ourselves; to grow into the people God made us to be in baptism as we “look for the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.” Our aim is to be faithful witnesses for Christ and for kingdom.

Mother Theresa is arguably the most notable saint of the last two generations. She provides an example of detachment. Mother Theresa did not aim to end poverty in Calcutta. Her aim was to love and serve the image of Christ in the poor. She said on one occasion. “We are not social workers. We do it Christ.” Detachment focuses on the acts of love themselves, not the goals that may or may not be achieved. Detachment seeks first the kingdom, and trusts God to add the things to us, or not, as he pleases.

III. Conclusion: Remembrance and the goal of life
On Easter we rise from the dead with Christ as we remember and renew our baptism. Therefore, during Easter, let us seek those things which are above. Let us practice giving thanks, let us practice reconciliation, and let practice detachment from the goals and anxieties of this world. “For you died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. When Christ who is our life appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory.”